Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Transit Memory 1

Introducing my first work in the Transit Memory series - a digital art collage composition having used my own scanned manipulated imagery of lace and papers and processed through Photoshop CS2.

Inspiration extends from my previous symbology abstract work development referencing notions of transcendental passage for growth in our world of duality and memory associations.

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“It (memory) is essential for much reasoning and decision-making, both individual and collective.” Also ”... an understanding of memory is likely to be important in making sense of the continuity of the self, of the relation between mind and body, and of our experience of time”.  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/memory/
(See below further reference notes taken from the Memory discussion source .)


Reference Notes

Meaning of Transit: The act of passing; passage through or over. Synonyms: pass through, pass across, pass over.

Memory  discussion source
Citation 
Sutton, John, "Memory", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2010 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = .

"Memory’ labels a diverse set of cognitive capacities by which we retain information and reconstruct past experiences, usually for present purposes. Memory is one of the most important ways by which our histories animate our current actions and experiences. Most notably, the human ability to conjure up long-gone but specific episodes of our lives is both familiar and puzzling, and is a key aspect of personal identity. Memory seems to be a source of knowledge. We remember experiences and events which are not happening now, so memory differs from perception. We remember events which really happened, so memory is unlike pure imagination. Yet, in practice, there can be close interactions between remembering, perceiving, and imagining. Remembering is often suffused with emotion, and is closely involved in both extended affective states such as love and grief, and socially significant practices such as promising and commemorating. It is essential for much reasoning and decision-making, both individual and collective. It is connected in obscure ways with dreaming. Some memories are shaped by language, others by imagery. Much of our moral and social life depends on the peculiar ways in which we are embedded in time. Memory goes wrong in mundane and minor, or in dramatic and disastrous ways.
 
... an understanding of memory is likely to be important in making sense of the continuity of the self, of the relation between mind and body, and of our experience of time,  ..." http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/memory/
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